Quotable Quotes

Quotable Quotes are typically longer, more sober, and more frequently verified and sourced than are Quotable Quips. Again, their order reflects chronology of collection and not significance of content or preference of value. Enjoy!

 

He who despises music, as do all the fanatics, does not please me. Music is a gift of God, not a gift of men….After theology I accord to music the highest place and greatest honor.

-Martin Luther

And let us not trust to human effort alone, but humbly acknowledging the power and goodness of Almighty God, who presides over the destiny of nations, and who has at all times been revealed in our country’s history, let us invoke His aid and His blessing upon our labors.

-President Grover Cleveland

The only assurance of our nation’s safety is to lay our foundation in morality and religion.

-President Abraham Lincoln

Providence has given to our people the choice of their rulers – and it is the duty as well as the privilege and to the best interests of this Christian nation, to select Christians for their rulers.

-John Jay, first Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court

The revisionist version of history has it that the Founding Fathers were not Christians, but primarily a group of deists. While that description might fit a very few, it is radically at odds with the views of most of them….The more you read, the more you are impressed by how much stronger and more public was the faith of Americans in those days. This country was founded as a Christian nation – not a theocracy, but a land whose people and leaders, whatever their sins and failings, overwhelmingly professed faith in Jesus Christ.

-Matthew Kaufman, editor, Illinois Family Citizen

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbled or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena; whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood;  who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.

-Theodore Roosevelt

It was for the love of the truths of this great Book [the Bible] that our fathers abandoned their native shores for the wilderness. Animated by its lofty principles, they toiled and suffered till the desert blossomed as the rose. The same truths sustained them in their resolutions to become a free nation.

-President Zachary Taylor

The foundations of our society and our government rest so much on the teachings of the Bible that it would be difficult to support them if faith in these teachings would cease to be practically universal in our country.

-President Calvin Coolidge

I ask that work should be looked upon, not as a necessary drudgery to be undergone for the purpose of making money, but as a way of life in which the nature of man should find its proper exercise and delight and so fulfil itself to the glory of God.

-Dorothy L. Sayers

It is the duty of nations as well as of men to own their dependence upon the overruling power of God, to confess their sins and transgressions in humble sorrow yet with assured hope that genuine repentance will lead to mercy and pardon…. Those nations only are blessed whose God is the Lord.

-Abraham Lincoln

Never give in. Never, never, never, never! Never yield in any way, great or small, large or petty, except to convictions of honor and good sense. Never yield to force and the apparently overwhelming might of the enemy.

-Winston Churchill

To consult a statistician after an experiment is finished is often merely to ask him to conduct a post mortem examination. He can perhaps say what the experiment died of.

-R.A. Fisher, Presidential Address to the First Indian Statistical Congress, 1938

But if I am destined to die, let my scabbard be empty, and my sword red with the blood of men who would deny freedom.

-Col. Travis of the Alamo, upon realization that all 185 soldiers would die within the fortress

I am only one, but still I am one.
I cannot do everything, but still I can do something;
and because I cannot do everything, I will not refuse to do something I can do.

-Edward Everett Hale (1822-1909, American author, reformer, Unitarian clergyman; author of The Man Without a Country

Whatever you neglect, neglect not the Bible. If a professed believer, beware how you blend in your reading the chaff of human fiction and story with the wheat of God’s Word. It is utterly impossible, reason as you may, that you can cultivate a spiritual and devout taste and desire for the truth of God and the fiction of man. The Bible and the novel can never stand side by side. As a Christian, guard against the light, frivolous, frothy literature of the day. It will lessen your conviction of what is true, it will depreciate the value of what is divine, it will impair your taste for what is spiritual, and it will bring poverty, barrenness, and death into your soul.

-Octavius Winslow, 1808-1878, in The Precious Things of God, Soli Deo Gloria Publications, Morgan, PA, 1994, pg 282-283.

In its bearing upon religion this vain notion is, however, no theme for mirth, for it is not only deceptive, but it threatens to be mischievous in a high degree. There is not a hair of truth upon this dog from its head to its tail, but it rends and tears the simple ones. In all its bearing upon scriptural truth, the evolution theory is in direct opposition to it. If God’s Word be true, evolution is a lie. I will not mince the matter: this is not the time for soft speaking.

– Baptist preacher Charles Haddon Spurgeon, on evolution, during his July 25, 1886, sermon entitled "Hideous Discovery."

Research on the origin of life seems to be unique in that the conclusion has already been authoritatively accepted … . What remains to be done is to find the scenarios which describe the detailed mechanisms and processes by which this happened.

One must conclude that, contrary to the established and current wisdom, a scenario describing the genesis of life on earth by chance and natural causes which can be accepted on the basis of fact and not faith has not yet been written.

-Yockey, H.P., A calculation of the probability of spontaneous biogenesis by information theory, Journal of Theoretical Biology 67:377–398, 1977; quotes from pp. 379, 396.

We are invited, brethren, most earnestly to go away from the old-fashioned belief of our forefathers because of the supposed discoveries of science. … You are not to be dogmatic in theology, my brethren, it is wicked; but for scientific men it is the correct thing. You are never to assert anything very strongly; but scientists may assert boldly what they cannot prove, and may demand a faith far more credulous than any we possess. Forsooth, you and I are to take our Bibles and shape and mold our belief to the ever-shifting teachings of so-called scientific men. What folly is this! Why, the march of science, falsely so-called, through the world may be traced by exploded fallacies and abandoned theories. Former explorers once adored are now ridiculed; the continual wreckings of false hypotheses is a matter of universal notoriety. You may tell where the learned have encamped by the debris left behind of suppositions and theories as plentiful as broken bottles.

-Charles Spurgeon, An All-Round MinistryAddresses to Ministers and Students, Chapter 4, "How to Meet the Evils of the Age", ~1890

Statistical Analysis: Mysterious, sometimes bizarre, manipulations performed upon the collected data of an experiment in order to obscure the fact that the results have no generalizable meaning for humanity. Commonly, computers are used, lending an additional aura of unreality to the proceedings.

-Unknown, taken from DOE FAQ Alert Vol. 8, No. 2, Feb 2008, by Stat-Ease

The human understanding when it has once adopted an opinion (either as being the received opinion or as being agreeable to itself) draws all things else to support and agree with it. And though there be a greater number and weight of instances to be found on the other side, yet these it either neglects and despises, or else by some distinction sets aside and rejects, in order that by this great and pernicious predetermination the authority of its former conclusions may remain inviolate.

-Sir Francis Bacon, Novum Organum (1620), Book One, Aphorism XLVI

Today’s scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality.

– Nikola Tesla, Modern Mechanics and Inventions, July, 1934, US (Serbian-born) electrical inventor (1857 – 1943)

"When I use a word," Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, "it means just what I choose it to mean–neither more nor less."

"The question is," said Alice, "whether you CAN make words mean so many different things."

"The question is," said Humpty Dumpty, "which is to be master– that’s all."

-Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass

"Contrariwise," continued Tweedledee, "if it was so, it might be; and if it were so, it would be; but as it isn’t, it ain’t. That’s logic."

-Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass

"Another sandwich!" said the King.

"There’s nothing but hay left now," the Messenger said, peeping into the bag.

"Hay, then," the King murmured in a faint whisper.

Alice was glad to see that it revived him a good deal. "There’s nothing like eating hay when you’re faint," he remarked to her, as he munched away.

"I should think throwing cold water over you would be better," Alice suggested: "or some sal-volatile."

"I didn’t say there was nothing BETTER," the King replied. "I said there was nothing LIKE it." Which Alice did not venture to deny.

-Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass

"I quite agree with you," said the Duchess; "and the moral of that is – ‘Be what you would seem to be’ – or if you’d like it put more simply – Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise."

"I think I should understand that better," Alice said very politely, "if I had it written down: but I can’t quite follow it as you say it."

-Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

Alice laughed. "There’s no use trying," she said: "One can’t believe impossible things."

"I dare say you haven’t had much practice," said the Queen. "When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast."

-Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass

 

"I see nobody on the road," said Alice.

"I only wish I had such eyes," the King remarked in a fretful tone. "To be able to see Nobody! And at this distance, too! Why, it’s as much as I can do to see real people, by this light!"

-Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass

If a man is offered a fact which goes against his instincts, he will scrutinize it closely, and unless the evidence is overwhelming, he will refuse to believe it. If, on the other hand, he is offered something which affords a reason for acting in accordance to his instincts, he will accept it even on the slightest evidence. The origin of myths is explained in this way.

-Bertrand Russell, British author, mathematician, & philosopher (1872 – 1970)

Progress isn’t made by early risers. It’s made by lazy men trying to find easier ways to do something.

-Robert Heinlein, Time Enough For Love, US science fiction author (1907 – 1988)

If we extend unlimited tolerance even to those who are intolerant, if we are not prepared to defend a tolerant society against the onslaught of the intolerant, then the tolerant will be destroyed, and tolerance with them. … We should therefore claim, in the name of tolerance, the right not to tolerate the intolerant.

–Sir Karl Popper

We live in a sea of information, an Information Age: and yet, it has been almost half a millennia since mankind has been so unwilling or unable to use critical thinking to separate the intellectual wheat from so…much…chaff! Critical Thinking – the ability to analyze data, determine its usefulness and fidelity, to learn how to assess reliability, question methodology, weight expertise and all the rest – is in shockingly short supply these days. It’s not just a shame; it’s an epidemic, it is a fatal  metastasizing disease in a democracy where information is used by the public to make the decisions that steer the ship of state. For the ability to think critically allows us to see the unseen; to find the truth behind the falsehood, as well as the falsehood behind the truth.

Today, it seems that legions of people – growing legions – are falling victims to ideas and beliefs that on the face of it are patently false…things that are so clearly and obviously nuts that you really have to wonder what deep, mighty engine of emotional need could possibly drive a brain so deep into a hole. Seriously now, there are millions and millions of people on this planet who will torture logic and reason to mind-bending extremes in order to believe monumentally ridiculous "theories" …theories drawn from an emotional need so warped and debased that you are catapulted beyond anger and disbelief directly into pathos and the desire to call 911 before these people hurt themselves.

Bill Whittle, Seeing the Unseen Part 1

All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.

– Edmund Burke, Irish orator, philosopher, and politician (1729-1797)

No one could make a greater mistake than he who did nothing because he could do only a little.

– Edmund Burke, Irish orator, philosopher, and politician (1729-1797)

No passion so effectually robs the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning as fear.

– Edmund Burke, Irish orator, philosopher, and politician (1729-1797), from
"A Philosophical Inquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful", 1756

Progress, far from consisting in change, depends on retentiveness. When change is absolute there remains no being to improve and no direction is set for possible improvement: and when experience is not retained, as among savages, infancy is perpetual. Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. In the first stage of life the mind is frivolous and easily distracted, it misses progress by failing in consecutiveness and persistence. This is the condition of children and barbarians, in which instinct has learned nothing from experience.

-George Santayana, US (Spanish-born) philosopher (1863-1952), The Life of Reason, Volume 1, 1905

…Historically, the claim of consensus has been the first refuge of scoundrels; it is a way to avoid debate by claiming that the matter is already settled. Whenever you hear the consensus of scientists agrees on something or other, reach for your wallet, because you’re being had.

Let’s be clear:

the work of science has nothing whatever to do with consensus. Consensus is the business of politics. Science, on the contrary, requires only one investigator who happens to be right, which means that he or she has results that are verifiable by reference to the real world. In science consensus is irrelevant. What is relevant is reproducible results. The greatest scientists in history are great precisely because they broke with the consensus.There is no such thing as consensus science. If it’s consensus, it isn’t science. If it’s science, it isn’t consensus. Period.
Michael Crichton, speech at California Institute of Technology, January 17, 2003

War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things: the decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks that nothing is worth a war, is much worse. … A man who has nothing which he is willing to fight for, nothing which he cares more about than he does about his personal safety, is a miserable creature who has no chance of being free, unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself. As long as justice and injustice have not terminated their ever-renewing fight for ascendancy in the affairs of mankind, human beings must be willing, when need is, to do battle for the one against the other.

-John Stuart Mill, Dissertations and Discussions (1868), Vol.1, page 26

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